Valentine’s Day

It is customary to send cards, called Valentines to loved ones on Valentine’s Day. To give away flowers, chocolates and other gifts. But what about the history and traditions behind the day?

The day has been celebrated since the 1300s and named after two saints. Both of these saints were Romans and died for their Christian faith. From one of them, who was a priest, originated the tradition of sending cards, known as Valentines, because he wrote a letter to the jailer’s daughter whom he had befriended and fell in love, “from your Valentine. The other was the bishop of Terni. However, there are theories that this was the same person.

Valentine’s day also has its origins in the Roman festival Lupercalia, held in mid-February. As the celebrated arrival of spring and a symbol of this feast were birds because it was thought that the birds’ mating season began in February. There were also fertility rites and pairing of women with men by lottery. Young men and women gathered and laid valentines in a box. Then they had to pull a card from the box. The one who Valentine’s card they got up would be their Valentine for a year.

During Valentine’s Day Cupid, the Roman god of love is usually celebrated. But during latter years expressions of affection among relatives and friends have become more common. Many school children exchange valentines with each other on this day.

Among the library staff we would like to recommend you some good books about love:

9187707292 the fault skräckens ängel hush hushsläppa

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